The Myth of Globalization

The myth of globalization has become the dominant narrative of American politics over the past three decades.

Its central thesis is that a rising tide lifts all boats.

It is a message that was reinforced by the election of President Donald Trump and has since been embraced by the president himself, whose rhetoric has been characterized by anti-globalization sentiments and calls for greater American involvement abroad.

But the rise of globalism and globalization, as well as the ongoing struggle for the rights of citizens of other nations, have also had a powerful impact on the rise in inequality in the United States.

It’s no accident that the rise has coincided with a decline in wages for many workers.

The United States has one of the highest rates of poverty in the world, and its share of the global economy has increased by over 30% in the past 30 years.

This trend has created an unprecedented situation where a growing share of income and wealth has accrued to a few at the top.

This is not an accident.

The rise of globalization has also been accompanied by the growth of inequality.

The global economy is no longer a global economy.

The rich have increasingly become a minority.

As a result, the economic status of the vast majority has declined.

Inequality in the U.S. and the world is the result of a failure of the U,S.

to fully address inequality and economic mobility, and a failure to properly address economic insecurity and inequality, as these conditions arise in many countries.

This article is part of a series.

You can read the rest of the series here.

This piece originally appeared on the Economic Policy Institute’s blog, The Rise of Globalism.